Find Pieces of the Treasure Map

Kids + Camp = Success

Summer Quests Day Camp is different than other camps. We create an immersive experience, plan an intentional program, hire only high quality staff, and create a safe space for everyone. My favorite part of working at camp is the opportunity to boost each camper’s confidence. encouraging them, and hopefully before week’s end, seeing them succeed on their own.

During our pirate week last summer, Blackbeard’s Crew was on a quest to discover the map pieces that would lead us to a hidden treasure. On the last day of camp, we found the last piece of the map in our SQDC signature camp mailbox. Ecstatic, they pulled out the previously found pieces and started fitting them together – was this really the last piece we needed?!? Would the treasure be nearby As they slid in the last piece into place, they all jumped up and were immediately ready to tackle the challenge of finding the treasure. We could barely get them to slow down enough to fill up their water bottle and apply a round a sunscreen before we went out in our search.

Watching the campers work together to complete the challenges all week, then assemble and follow the map to the treasure chest was both inspiring and exhilarating. It was clear the goal we had from way back when this camp idea was just that – an idea – was working! Here it is happening, in real life, right in front of us! These campers are experiencing teamwork, building confidence, practicing problem solving, reinforcing interpersonal skills, and of course, making memories that will last a lifetime.

And as if all that wasn’t enough, they pulled the heavy wooden trunk, full of treasure (old silver mugs, jewelry, and gems) onto the rocks, lifted the lid to check out their bounty and one camper exclaimed “Whoa, it’s real!” My heart skipped a little happy beat. That is when I realized, as much as we are doing all those things above for our campers, our campers help do all those things for us. We are better camp owners, directors, and people for the time spent with your kids. We are extremely lucky to have the opportunity!

At Summer Quests Day Camp we work to exceed expectations and create a lasting and memorable experience. I’m not gonna lie, it can be hard work, but watching those campers find the treasure chest for the first time made it all worth it.

Day Camp wizards posing in front of tree with whomping willow sign

5 Reasons Why Great Parents Send Their Kids to Camp

This article was originally published at acacamps.org by Audrey Monke, MA.

Day Camp wizards posing in front of tree with whomping willow sign

My shy, quiet nine-year-old went to camp not knowing a soul. Two weeks later, she came home transformed. She blossomed. She made friends, learned a multitude of activities, felt safe, loved, confident, and happy — really, really happy. As hard as it was on me, it was all worth it for her. It was the single best thing I have ever done for her.
—First-time camp parent

Many parents won’t allow their child to go on a school field trip or school outdoor education trip unless they are chaperoning, so it’s no surprise that those same parents may find the idea of sending their child to sleep-away camp incomprehensible. As a camp parent, you may get a shocked response from one of these “non-camp” parents. They may ask you things like, “How can you stand having your child away from you for so long?” or, “How will she survive without you?” or, “Isn’t he too young to go to camp alone?” Or, they may comment, “I would never send my child away to camp for two weeks.” In all of these negative responses, there is an underlying criticism of your parenting.

If you find yourself in the awkward position of being criticized for the decision to send your young child to camp, you may want some extra “ammunition” to defend your decision. And, if you are never in the position of defending your camp decision, let this list remind you about just a few of the many reasons why you are being a great parent by sending your child to camp!

At camp this summer, your child will . . . >>Read More